Blog

  • From Instruction to Delight, 4th edition, by Patricia Demers

    - October 31, 2016

    As a previous instructor in children’s and YA literature, I today received an announcement from Oxford UP that the 4th edition of Patricia Demers From Instruction to Delight, one of the cornerstones of studies in the development of children’s literature as a genre, has just been released. While I am sadly not posting a full review, I strongly advocate that any of you who are interested in children’s literature, as either an academic or personal pursuit, read this important study.

    Pat Demers’s other hats, as most of you will know, are numerous. Most notably at CWRC is her Canadian Women Writing and Reading from 1950 project.

    Congratulations, Pat, on the new release!

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  • CWRC Beta Site Launch

    - June 8, 2016

    The beta version of  The Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory (CWRC) website was launched on May 29th 2016 at the Congress of the HSSFC held at the University of Calgary. The “beta” label  means that although the core functionality is in place, there will be further developments, debugging, and optimization. It will probably undergo some changes as it progresses towards the final site so expect some changes and updates over time. A big shout out to our design partner, Digital Echidna, for their fabulous work on the interface.

     

    About 50 people came out for the launch. We had a packed program with presentations from nine researchers and partners along with CWRC team members Mihaela Ilovan, Michael Brundin, and Susan Brown. Partners who presented included: Deanna Reder and Alix Shield of The People and the Text; Peter Sinnema, chair of English and Film Studies at University of Alberta;

    Patricia Demers, ...

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  • CWILA Count 2014

    - October 11, 2015

     

    On October 8th, CWILA introduced the results of their annual Count for 2014 – the largest count yet. Erin Wunker writes that since its first Count in 2012 until its fourth Count in 2014, CWILA has seen “a marked shift in in the gendered representation in Canada’s literary review.” What Wunker calls “CWILA effect” is visible – there has been a “quantifiable shift in gender representation in those publications we review year after year,” she explains.

    This project relies on 42 volunteers to manually input and verify all the data, which is why the scope of the Count is limited. In the 2014 Count 5,866 book reviews published across 32 Canadian journals and newspapers, including five French-language publications, were counted. Fiction and non-fiction books comprise the majority of the books reviewed.

     

    The results show that:

    the number of women reviewing books increased – it is now near-equal to male reviewers women ...

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  • Canadian Women in the Literary Arts (CWILA) – project Count

    - October 2, 2015

    Canadian Women in the Literary Arts “addresses the need for female writers to engage in conversations regarding the critical reception of women’s creative writing” (cwila.ca). This is why CWILA runs an annual “count” to establish the proportion of critical reviews written by women relative to men (taking into account genderqueer-authored reviews), as well as accounting for the genders of the author of the text under review: how many texts written by women were reviewed by men and vice versa. Founded in 2012, CWILA has been investigating gender representation in Canadian literary reviews for four years now in order to “quantify the existing but often silent gender inequities within Canadian critical culture” (Scholes).

    The Count project addresses the “gender imbalance in [Canadian] critical discourse” (Jerome) by looking into nationally circulated publications and counting the number of male and female authored reviews in them. It also looks into whether books (across ...

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  • Incidental news from Glasgow and London

    - October 1, 2015

    The connections seem infinite…

    Deb Martens, a fellow Canadian living in London, maintains a blog about Canadian Writers Abroad. She has posted a link to Michelle Smith’s review of Ann-Marie MacDonald’s Adult Onset (2014). I thought I would share it with you all, given Michelle’s work (with Faye Hammill) on Magazines, Travel and Middlebrow Culture, a part of the CWRC family of projects.

    Insightful review, Michelle.

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  • 3 August 2015: Adventures in Research Opus 4 (written by Lindsey Bannister)

    - September 10, 2015
    Adventures in Research Opus 4 Martha Craig’s Story of Reincarnation

     

    Martha Craig as Princess Ye-wa-go-no-nee, from the frontispiece to Legends of the North Land (c1910)

     

    Days after his death, an article in the North Bay Nugget revealed the true identity of writer, lecturer and conservationist Grey Owl (Archie Belaney) (1888-1938). While Grey Owl publicly identified himself as the son of an Apache woman and Scottish man, he was, in truth, an English man fascinated by North American indigenous cultures.   Nearly forty years prior to this revelation, the Irish-born writer, explorer, and scientist Martha Craig (b. c1875) lectured to crowded halls and auditoriums in Toronto, New York and Washington D.C. as Princess Ye-wa-go-no-nee. “Will you believe me,” Craig asked an audience in Brooklyn, “when I tell you that in the life before this one, I was a Canadian Indian girl [?]”

    Craig’s complicated life story is difficult to piece together. Newspaper reports ...

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  • The Future Now: Canada’s Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory

    - April 7, 2015

    The Royal Society of Canada/La Société royale du Canada (RSC/SRC) has released its report on the The Future Now: Canada’s Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory: A Report of the Royal Society of Canada’s Expert Panel on the Status and Future of Canada’s Libraries and Archives. The report is available for purchase here and the pdf is available here.

    From the RSC/SRC website:

    Since the 1950s debate has raged about the impact of new technologies on print culture in the broadest sense and on the publishing industry, libraries, and archives in particular. Succinctly put, “The Death of the Book” has been both proclaimed and denied. Meanwhile, notions of what constitutes a library or an archive have been challenged and transformed by new communications competencies and needs. In response to these realities, the Royal Society of Canada is establishing an Expert Panel on “The Future Now: Canada’s Libraries, Archives, and Public ...

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  • Islandora Camp BC 2015

    - March 12, 2015

    Last month (16-18 February 2015), the Islandora Camp BC 2015 was held here in Vancouver, and I was lucky enough to attend and represent Canada’s Early Women Writers (CEWW) specifically and CWRC more broadly. My contribution was to highlight CWRC Writer as a custom application embedded in Islandora, and to show other “campers” its advantages over, say, using Oxygen Editor for xml tagging and mark-up. (Also to show how pretty CWRC Writer is…) I presented Monday afternoon, the first day of the camp, with Mimi Lam from UBC Library; Rebecca Dowson, who is the English and History liaison librarian here at SFU Library; and Mark Leggott, who is one of the initial designers of Islandora, and currently University Librarian at UPEI and President of discoverygarden inc., a commercial Islandora services company.

    The audience contained a significant number of librarians and others who were well-versed in Islandora as ...

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  • Canada’s Early Women Writers: An Interview with Karyn Huenemann

    - February 28, 2015

    Sara Jeannette Duncan, E. Pauline Johnson, Nellie McClung

    Karyn Huenemann is the Project Manager of Canada’s Early Women Writers (CEWW). She took the time to answer some of my questions and share her perspective and experiences of this long-term collaborative project, which aims to build a bio-biographical database of Canadian English-language writers published before 1950. You can visit the current website, and browse the original database.

    I noticed many comments on your website from interested readers. What has been the level of public engagement with this project?

    The level of input from the online community has been astounding. The internet is an amazing source—actually, tool. A little story:

    I was rather taken with the poetry of RH Grenville, but didn’t know if this poet was male or female. When googling the name, I came across a comment on a blog answering this very question. The comment was something like ...

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  • Call for Applications – Sponsored spots at DHSI CWRCshop 2015

    - January 16, 2015
    Do you have a digital research project in mind or underway that will use the CWRC platform?  Would you appreciate having dedicated time to develop your project amidst friendly and helpful digital humanities scholars? Are you interested in learning more about making digital humanities tools a part of your research life and attending a week-long intensive course at a prestigious summer institute that includes lectures and social events and provides a great introduction to the digital humanities as a field and as a community? Do you have research assistants who would benefit from training in the use of CWRC? Would you like to connect with other CWRC researchers and others with digital projects? The Canadian Writing and Research Collaboratory is excited to announce that we’re inviting applications for sponsored attendance at our CWRCshop at DHSI 2015. It consists of five days of intensive coursework, small-group seminars, lectures, and demonstrations by experts ...

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