Blog

  • CWRC-shop at DHSI 2014

    - June 12, 2014

    We just held our first CWRCshop at DHSI 2014 at University of Victoria where the campus was absolutely gorgeous with spring flowers and marauding deer (no bunnies, sadly).

    DHSI was bigger than ever this year–28 courses!–including ours in Collaborative Online Scholarship. I was very pleased to have co-teaching with me Karyn Huenemann, manager of the Canada’s Early Women Writers Project at SFU, and Michael Brundin, CWRC metadata co-ordinator, and Mihaela Ilovan, CWRC project manager, both from U of Alberta. In the background, in Edmonton, was Jeffery Antoniuk, valiantly working away to help ensure that things were running. We had a big development push leading up to DHSI and were still testing thing and working to get some things working better while the course was proceeding: not the ideal scenario as these things go, but class members were extremely patient and forgiving of the glitches that we ran across, ...

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  • Hackfest 2013: Text Mining and Visualization for Literary History

    - September 18, 2013

    [This is the second in a series of posts on the TM & V hackfests. See the first at Stefan Sinclair’s blog.]

    At the beginning of May, as those of us from Northern Alberta were at last starting to recover from our final late-April dump of snow, a group of intrepid scholars, literary researchers, and programmers gathered in sunny southern Ontario to participate in a Hackfest focused on data mining and visualization for literary history. Many of us were affiliated in various ways with the Orlando, CWRC, INKE, or Voyant Tools projects. In addition to our enjoyment of the beautiful weather and pristine locale, we ate some fantastic food, played pool, snooker, and frisbee,  chatted about our absent children, and ...

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  • The Joy of Hackfests

    - July 22, 2013

    This is the first of a series of posts on our late spring hackfest for the Text Mining and Visualization project. The first of them is “The Joy of Hackfests” at Stéfan Sinclair’s blog, “the scribblings & musings of an incorrigible digital humanist.”

    He describes his involvement with the cryptically named non-NER non-RDF visualization team. Other small groups were working on machine learning with WEKA and named entity extraction as well as generating RDF and visualizing triples from the Orlando Project textbase.

     

     

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  • 1908 Sui Sin Far story republished

    - December 2, 2012

    Mary Chapman, UBC, has just had published an article entitled “Finding Edith Eaton” in Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 29.2 (2012): 263-69. What is most wonderful is that her article is followed by a previously unavailable story by Eaton (writing as Sui Sin Far): “The Success of a Mistake” (270-79). As noted in its introduction, this story first appeared in the Westerner 8.3 (1908): 18–21. Another critical article, “The Queer Newspaperwoman in Edith Eaton’s ‘The Success of a Mistake'” (280-99), by Jean M. Lutes, follows the story. I’ll let you read the story and articles yourselves for further illumination….

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  • Canadian Writers Abroad

    - October 9, 2012

    This is just a very short note to bring attention to an interesting blog posted by a Canadian academic living in London, Debra Martens. Her blog is Canadian Writers Abroad, which tells you the topic… What is most interesting, I think, is the breadth of information and the variety of authors she blogs about. Her topics are both contemporary and historical, specific authors and associated issues. I have to say that my favourite blogs, of course, are those about Sara Jeannette Duncan, but more recent authors such as Mavis Gallant and Jane Urquhart also grace her digital pages.

    I just thought some of you might like to check it out…

    Karyn Huenemann (CEWW)

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  • A Collaboratory in Need of Occasional Walls

    - June 14, 2012

    By  Melissa Dalgleish, PhD Candidate, York University

    In 1989, William Wulf defined the collaboratory as a “center without walls, in which the nation’s researchers can perform their research without regard to physical location, interacting with colleagues, accessing instrumentation, sharing data and computational resources, [and] accessing information in digital libraries.” This definition of collaboratory describes, almost perfectly, the new EMiC Modernist Commons (modernistcommons.ca), the online edition creation environment that I spent a glorious week at DHSI getting to play in. The idea behind the Commons is that it allows researchers from across the country—and across the globe—to produce digital editions using shared data (the archival images and document transcriptions uploaded to the site) and computational resources (the embedded CWRC Writer for TEI markup and the Shared Canvas image-markup tool), thus freeing individual scholars from having to cobble together tools, software, and publication venues on their own. The Modernist Commons is, fundamentally, a ...

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  • SDH/SEMI Roundtable on Conversation, Collaboration, Credit: The Graduate Researcher in the Digital Scholarly Environment

    - June 4, 2012

    By Constance Crompton (Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria)

    I remember my first Congress presentation: I was new grad student, fresh-minted, nervous, and reliant on my carefully prepared PowerPoint presentation. With all that I had heard about Congress, I expected to present to dozens of people, but alas, my 9:00am spot on a Tuesday morning only yielded a sleepy audience of six.

    The graduate students who led the “Roundtable on Conversation, Collaboration, Credit: The Graduate Researcher in the Digital Scholarly Environment”, Daniel Powell (Victoria/ETCL), Tara Thomson(Victoria/MVP), Matt Bouchard (Toronto/EMiC), Melissa Dalgleish (York/EMiC), Andy Keenan (Toronto/Digital Economy Trading Zones Project and The Inclusive Design Institute), Alyssa Anne McLeod (Victoria/ETCL), had the converse experience. The room was packed, the discussion was lively, and they extemporized, rather than relying on prepared scripts.

    Daniel Powell organized the panel in order to ...

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  • Identifying and Migrating

    - May 28, 2012

    By Pat Demers (English and Film Studies, University of Alberta)

    The retrospective observation of Atwood’s narrator in “My Last Duchess,” a story about a high school English teacher whose standards made a lasting impression, from her collection Moral Disorder, supplies one way of encapsulating what I continue to learn in the CanWWR project. Grouping the revered Miss Bessie with other exceptional teachers, the narrator sums up their importance:

    They knew something we needed to know, but it was a complicated thing–not so much a thing as a pattern, like the clues in a detective story once you started connecting them together. These women–these teachers–had no direct method of conveying this thing to us, not in a way that would make us listen, because it was too tangled, it was too oblique. It was hidden within the stories.

    This note will outline the ongoing team work–patterns, clues, connections–in the Canadian Women Writing and Reading from ...

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  • Expanding the CanWWR Framework

    - May 25, 2012

    Digital Humanities projects are living things. The germ of an idea sends out shoots that branch and flower until the initial conception has taken on a bigger and richer form than could ever be anticipated. It’s a wonder to watch and a privilege to contribute to.

    Dr. Patricia Demers’ Canadian Women Writing and Reading from 1950 (CanWWR) eloquently demonstrates the ways in which a project grows. Since I came onto the project in September of 2010, the listings of writers, works and critical studies alone has expanded considerably. This, however, is just a small measure of how the project has developed.

    CanWWR began as a listing of writers and their works, categorized by genre, decade and awards won. Unique among such listings, Dr. Demers incorporated not only writers of prose, poetry and plays, but also singer/songwriters, composers, graphic storytellers and screenwriters. This was presented first in PDF and then on a public ...

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  • Lasting Change: Sustaining Digital Scholarship and Culture in Canada

    - December 7, 2010

    The report of the Sustaining Digital Scholarship for Sustainable Culture Group is now available as a pdf (web version coming soon). Lasting Change (available by clicking here) is a Knowledge Synthesis on the Digital Economy funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada from August to December 2010.

    The group was comprised of Di Brandt, Andrew Bretz, Susan Brown, Lynn Copeland, Patricia Demers, Michael Eberle-Sinatra, Daniel Fischlin, Dean Irvine, Ashok Mathur, Hannah McGregor, Robyn Read, Susan Rudy, Stan Ruecker, Chantal Savoie, Ray Siemens, Stephen Slemon, Robin Sokoloski, Ron Walker, Darren Wershler, and Ann Wilson.

    Here is the Executive Summary from Lasting Change: Sustaining Digital Scholarship and Culture in Canada:

    Executive Summary

    This report reflects the growing concern in the scholarly and cultural communities, and beyond, regarding the sustainability of Canada’s digital knowledge and heritage. Canada’s digital advantage is only of value if it can be carried ...

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